Amritsar | India
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Amritsar (ਅੰਮ੍ਰਿਤਸਰ) is a city in the state of Punjab, India. It is considered holy in the Sikh religion.

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About

Golden Temple, Amritsar The name Amritsar name derives from the pool around the Golden Temple (aka Harmandir Sahib) and means "holy pool of nectar" (Amrit elixir; Sar, short for sarovar which means "lake"). Amritsar is one of the largest cities in the Indian state of Punjab and is the spiritual and cultural centre of the Sikh religion. Sikhs are rightfully very proud of the city and their very beautiful and unique Gurdwara (place of worship), the Golden Temple. Amritsar is today a major pilgrimage centre for Sikhs and a tourism centre for anyone. History Amritsar is known mainly for its Golden Temple which was initiated by Guru Ram Das, the fourth Sikh Guru and the founder of the city, and completed in 1601 by his successor Guru Arjan Dev Ji. The Jallianwala Bagh massacre or Amritsar massacre occurred in 1919. The area where this occurred was a large, open square but walled in on all sides. British troops opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators, and a large number were killed — the British said 370 dead and 1,200 wounded but Indian sources say the total was well over 1,000 dead. Some of the victims were, in fact, demonstrating, protesting against the arrest of two political activists, while others were gathered to celebrate the traditional festival of Baisakhi. Not all died directly due to British fire; many were trampled in the stampede to escape and others died diving down a well to avoid the bullets. Today the well is a rather grisly tourist attraction and bullet holes are still visible on walls around the area. The massacre news spread quickly all over the country caused widespread outrage and additional demonstrations as it stunned the entire sub-continent. Eventually, the public lost faith in the British colonial government and subsequently, this massacre initiated the "Non-cooperation movement" led by the father of the nation, Mahatma Gandhi. It is considered a significant phase of the Indian independence movement from British rule. Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple It also had a tremendous effect in the UK, with many of the more liberal British appalled by it while others thought it necessary. A commission investigated and concluded that "General Dyer thought he had crushed the rebellion and Sir Michael O'Dwyer was of the same view, ... (but) there was no rebellion which required to be crushed." Dyer was in command on the spot and O'Dwyer the provincial governor. During the partition of the Indian Subcontinent in 1947, the Punjab region was divided between India and Pakistan near Amritsar. Pakistan wanted to annexe Amritsar due to its close proximity with Lahore and 50% Muslim population; however, the city remained inside Indian territory. Similarly, India wanted to annexe Lahore. Both of the cities experienced some of the worst communal riots during the partition. Mass evacuations were made both in Amritsar and in Lahore. Hence, the demographics of both the cities were changed following the partition, significantly altering the culture and affecting the political, economic and social environment of the cities. @media all and (max-width:720px){body.skin-minerva .mw-parser-output .climate-table{float:none!important;clear:none!important;margin-right:0!important}body.skin-minerva .mw-parser-output .climate-table .infobox .infobox{}} In June 1984, an Indian military operation ordered by then Prime Minister of India, Indira Gandhi, was launched in the city to remove a few hundred Sikh militants who had taken control of the Golden Temple compound. After a few hundred people were killed during the 5-day siege, thousands of civilians were killed throughout the country in the aftermath.

Amritsar

Planning a Trip

1 Get in 1.1 By plane 1.1.1 To/from airport 1.2 By train 1.3 By bus 1.4 By car 1.5 From Pakistan The best time to visit Amritsar is during winter, especially between October and March. By plane 31.7072974.806671 Raja Sansi International Airport (Sri Guru Ram Dass Jee International Airport ATQ IATA) (About 11 km northwest from the city centre.), ☎ +91 183 2214166, fax: +91 183 2214358, e-mail: apdasr@aai.aero. It's one of the modern airports in India and quite adequate if not exactly exciting. Most flights are to Delhi, an hour away, but there are an increasing number of international connections: Air India flies to Birmingham and there are also a surprising number of flights to Central Asia (Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan). Qatar Airways now flies to Doha.    To/from airport Taxi drivers wait outside the arrivals gate for visitors. For a trip into town, even the prepaid taxi can be bargained down with the drivers to ₹300 from initially ridiculous prices of ₹550 a person (as of March 2014) before you pay, but there is a significant dearth of official taxis or even auto-rickshaws, so prepare for a hard time. Uber is not available (2017), however OLA is available. OLA charges around ₹350 and it slaps a ₹100 charge for parking which is not apparent while booking. This charge is applied both during airport pickup and drop off. Also, there is a zone around the Golden Temple in which automotive vehicles are prohibited. Though not stringently applied, the streets do get very narrow, and you will probably end up making the last ten minutes of the trip on foot. The cheapest way to and from the airport is by local bus. Take the bus to Ajnala (stand 19 in the city bus stand) and tell the conductor that you go to the airport. The bus costs ₹15 (December 2018). The bus will drop you in the main road, about 1 km away from the airport. You could walk this in about 15 minutes or take a rickshaw or auto from there. The way back should be the same, just walk to the main road and hail down any bus going into the city. If you are staying near the Golden Temple a shared electric auto to the bus stand is ₹10. By train 31.633374.86722 Amritsar Junction Railway Station (IR station code : ASR) (North of Golen Temple Complex). An important railway station that is well connected to major cities in India through daily trains. Trains can be booked online, at the train station.  31.6185774.878273 Train Booking Office, Golden Temple Unit, Baba Attal Road (In the Golden Temple Complex). The most convenient place to book a ticket. Book your return train ticket as soon as you arrive in Amritsar, or before if you know the exact date, as trains are often heavily booked.  Here are some useful trains to get to Amritsar: Also see Rail travel in India By bus 31.629974.88344 Amritsar Bus Terminal (ISBT Amritsar), Mehar Pura (East one km from Station). The city is well-connected by bus to most major cities and the northern areas within a days drive. Pathankot (2½ hours, 100 km), Jalandahar (80 km), Kapurthala, royal city,(65 km) and there are daily direct buses to New Delhi (around 480 km), Jammu (north 220km via Pathankot), Katra (north 280 km), Chandigarh (230 km), Dharamsala (northeast 200 km, once daily, ~6 hours), etc. Electric rickshaw to the Golden Temple area are ₹10. (updated Dec 2018) By car Long-distance taxis are available from most places. It takes around 6–7 hours from New Delhi via NH-1. Amritsar is well-connected by bus to most major cities and the northern areas within a days drive. Pathankot is about 2½ hours away and about 100 km away, Jalandhar is about 80 km from here, Kapurthala is about 65 km from here and there are daily direct buses to New Delhi, Jammu, Katra, Chandigarh, Dharamsala (once daily, ~6 hours), etc. You can find Volvo buses from Chandigarh, Delhi and Katra to Amritsar. From Pakistan If coming from Wagah at the Pakistani border, take a cycle-rickshaw (₹15, 3 km) to the Attari station, where you can catch a local bus to Amritsar (₹20, 25 km). Another possibility is to hop on one of the tourist buses which are going directly from the border back to Amritsar city centre daily after sunset. Taxis also use this route and charge around ₹200 for the entire journey.

Amritsar

Getting Around

By plane 31.7072974.806671 Raja Sansi International Airport (Sri Guru Ram Dass Jee International Airport ATQ IATA) (About 11 km northwest from the city centre.), ☎ +91 183 2214166, fax: +91 183 2214358, e-mail: apdasr@aai.aero. It's one of the modern airports in India and quite adequate if not exactly exciting. Most flights are to Delhi, an hour away, but there are an increasing number of international connections: Air India flies to Birmingham and there are also a surprising number of flights to Central Asia (Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan). Qatar Airways now flies to Doha.    To/from airport Taxi drivers wait outside the arrivals gate for visitors. For a trip into town, even the prepaid taxi can be bargained down with the drivers to ₹300 from initially ridiculous prices of ₹550 a person (as of March 2014) before you pay, but there is a significant dearth of official taxis or even auto-rickshaws, so prepare for a hard time. Uber is not available (2017), however OLA is available. OLA charges around ₹350 and it slaps a ₹100 charge for parking which is not apparent while booking. This charge is applied both during airport pickup and drop off. Also, there is a zone around the Golden Temple in which automotive vehicles are prohibited. Though not stringently applied, the streets do get very narrow, and you will probably end up making the last ten minutes of the trip on foot. The cheapest way to and from the airport is by local bus. Take the bus to Ajnala (stand 19 in the city bus stand) and tell the conductor that you go to the airport. The bus costs ₹15 (December 2018). The bus will drop you in the main road, about 1 km away from the airport. You could walk this in about 15 minutes or take a rickshaw or auto from there. The way back should be the same, just walk to the main road and hail down any bus going into the city. If you are staying near the Golden Temple a shared electric auto to the bus stand is ₹10.

Amritsar

Things to do

1 Get around 1.1 By bus 1.2 By auto-rickshaw 1.3 By car 31°38′3″N 74°52′25″EMap of Amritsar 31.62174.87811 Tourist Information Centre, Golden Temple, ☎ +91 78 376 13200 (Deepak Kumar mobil), e-mail: todamritsar@gmail.com.  31.6044174.573792 Tourism Office of Punjab State, ICP, Attari Border, ☎ +91 98 767 88 683, e-mail: dto.ankur@gmail.com.  31.633974.86763 Punjab Tourism Office, Railway Station, Outer Gate, Railway Station (opposite Irrigation Department), ☎ +91 78 376 13 500, e-mail: dtoasra@gmail.com.  By bus City public bus system introduced. There is a free bus service from the train station to the golden temple run by Golden Temple trust. It drops you right at the accommodation booking office of the Golden Temple where you can get double bed room for ₹1000 per day. By auto-rickshaw An auto-rickshaw from the train station to the temple should cost around ₹20, while a cycle-rickshaw will cost about ₹30. Electric rickshaw between the Golden Temple area and the bus stand are ₹10. By car If you have your own car to get around Amritsar then simply confirm the directions with a local guide. In case you don't have your own car then there are several travel agencies that can offer you the car of your choice. Renting a car is less time-consuming and affordable. Experienced car drivers know all the shortcuts within the city and will take you to the best hotel or restaurant. Never pay the entire fare to the car agent in advance and don't leave expensive luggage in your car whenever you are visiting a site.

Amritsar