Delhi | India
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Delhi

The capital of India

Delhi (Hindi: दिल्ली, Punjabi: ਦਿੱਲੀ, Urdu: دلّی) is India's capital and seat of government. It forms the National Capital Territory of Delhi, rather than being part of a state. Delhi is one of India's largest cities, and the core of one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world, with over 28½ million inhabitants (2018). Within India it is a major centre of arts, commerce, education, tourism, and transit. As the capital of several empires over the last 2000 years, Delhi also contains a striking array of well-preserved historic sites for tourists to visit.

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Getting Around

Contents 1 Get around 1.1 By metro 1.2 By local train 1.3 By bus 1.3.1 Hop on Hop off 1.4 By taxi 1.5 By car 1.5.1 Transportation Network Taxis 1.6 By auto rickshaws 1.7 By cycle rickshaws 1.8 By electric rickshaw 1.9 By foot See also: Public transport in the National Capital Region (India) Getting around Delhi is always an adventure. Traffic is, by and large, horribly congested and many drivers will think nothing of quoting ten times the going price to a tourist. Use the prices below as broad guidelines and agree on prices before setting off. The best way to travel is via metro, where there are separate cabins for women (which prove to be very useful during rush hour). Metro is clean, efficient, and typically ridden by relatively affluent middle-class students or commuters en route to/from work; there is almost nowhere in the city that you cannot get to by metro. By metro The modern Delhi Metro, a sign of India's economic development Delhi Metro and rail network The fast-growing Delhi Metro network provides a cheap, quick, hassle-free and air-conditioned way of zipping around the city. As of May 2018, the following lines are open: Red Line: Dilshad Garden - Rithala Yellow Line: Samaypur Badli - HUDA City Centre, Gurgaon Blue Line: Dwarka Sector 21 - Noida Electronic City/Vaishali Blue Line branch: Yamuna Bank - Vaishali Green Line: Mundka - Inderlok Green Line branch: Ashok Park Main - Kirti Nagar Violet Line: Kashmere Gate - Escorts Mujesar Airport Express: New Delhi Railway Station - Airport - Dwarka Magenta Line: Janakpuri West - Botanical Garden Pink Line: Majilis Park - Shiv Vihar Fares range from ₹10-60, just buy a token, change lines as necessary, and deposit the token in the slot as you exit. Tokens can be used only from the station they are bought, so you can't buy two and use the second to return home. If you're planning on sticking around for a while, you can buy a "Smart Card" for ₹200, which is worth ₹150 and includes a ₹50 deposit; using this saves 10% and, more importantly, lets you avoid the queues. There is also a "Tourist Card" allowing unlimited use for ₹150 (1 day) or ₹300 (3 days), but it's highly unlikely that you'll travel enough to make this pay off. Special fares apply for travel on the Airport Express. During rush hour, you might have to queue up for 20min+ due to security checks, especially in the central stations. The Yellow Line (Line 2), in particular, is useful for getting to the Old Delhi (Chandni Chowk, Jama Masjid) and New Delhi railway stations, the ISBT bus terminal, the backpacker ghetto of Paharganj, Hauz Khas and Qutub Minar. The Blue Line (Line 3) is also handy for visiting Akshardham and accessing the western parts of Paharganj through RK Ashram Marg station. Beware: Metro stations all use the new, official, Indianised names, so Connaught Place is "Rajiv Chowk", Old Delhi Railway Station is "Chandni Chowk" and ISBT is "Kashmere Gate". The first coach in every train is reserved for women only, violating it incurs a penalty. Male passengers accompanying females are forbidden too. Be aware that if you wish to exit at a main station during rush hour, you will have to tackle your way through in order to get out before the opposite flow of passengers push you back inside. Don't be afraid of using your strength to push yourself out. By local train There are limited commuter services on Delhi's railways, but the facilities are a far cry from the user-friendly Metro stations. For the most part, train stations are inconveniently located. There is no passenger service on the Delhi Ring Railway outside rush hour. By bus You're never alone on a bus in Delhi All parts of Delhi are well connected by buses and with tickets ranging from ₹5-15 they are very cheap, but they are also quite crowded most of the time. The red coloured buses are air-conditioned and the green coloured are not. As bus stops do not have bus routes written properly, it can be difficult to find your way. Asking other people at the bus stop is often the best way to find out about bus routes to your destination. However, the buses are pretty frequent, running every 15-20 min or so on most routes. There are two kinds of buses in Delhi: Government run DTC buses (red and green coloured with big windows) Privately run Blue-Line buses (orange coloured) If you have a choice, opt for a DTC bus. They will stop less frequently and will generally be less crowded too. Note that many buses, DTC ones too, will stop pretty much anywhere if there are enough people getting on or off. Board buses at the back and pay the ticket seller sitting right next to the door. Be sure to hang onto your tickets, as ticket checks are fairly frequent. Some seats on the left side of the bus may be reserved for women and the handicapped. When it's time to disembark, move to the front of the bus. As you might expect, all these guidelines are regularly ignored when buses are very crowded. Hop on Hop off Hop on Hop off Delhi Tourism Bus HOHO, ☏ +91 11 4094 0000 (Helpline). Delhi Tourism operates a Hop On Hop Off bus service. A fleet of air conditioned low floored buses follow a pre-defined set of stops around the city and passengers can hop off the bus, see the place at one's own convenience and hop on the next bus. The service runs on a 45 minute interval and covers important monuments, memorials, museums and shopping places in the city. Each bus is staffed with a knowledgeable English speaking guide. The ticket costs ₹ 300 and is valid for 2 consecutive days. The service does not operate on Mondays.  By taxi Official Taxi A taxi or hired car (usually with driver) is required to see many of the far-flung sites within and around Delhi. However, the metro is a far cheaper and equally comfortable option. Most Delhi taxis are old but reliable CNG-run Ambassadors or Omnis in distinctive black-and-yellow livery and a green stripe. The hired family car of choice is usually a Toyota Innova or Chevrolet Tavera. While all are equipped with meters and should cost ₹15 for the first km ₹8.5 per km, the meters are often rigged and it's better to agree on the price in advance. Most trips around the city should be ₹200-500, while a trip to the airport would be higher, depending on starting location. An eight-hour charter should cost around ₹1,500, and a tip is expected if the driver is helpful. The prices would also depend upon the vehicle size too. Black and yellow taxis are not air-conditioned. Even if they do have air conditioning, you will be charged extra (and the rates are up to the driver, so bargain hard). Modern radio taxi services: at ₹20/km, they're more the list price of the competition, but they use modern vehicles with air-conditioning and GPS and can be dialled 24 hr/day. The flag fare is ₹20, and the fare increases by ₹5 for every 250 m after the first km. If you need an SUV, you need to inform the company in advance, but the fare remains the same. Night charges (25% extra) apply between 11PM to 5AM. Book up to a few hours in advance. Many corporate people rely on these cabs for their daily commute and they may be booked during office hours. Tipping is not expected. After booking, you will receive an SMS with the car licence plate number, and the driver's name and mobile number. Usually the driver will call you and inform you that they have arrived. Many drivers speak English at a very basic level, so use short phrases. You can use TaxiPixi services and avoid all the hassle. Download the app on your iPhone/Android. Don't take non-official taxis, they might take you to wrong hotels, or to a "tourist information centre", and try to sell you overpriced things. To be on the safe side, Check that whether the driver has their official documentation or not. By car Delhi, The road conditions are generally better than in the rest of India. Traffic Jam is the major concern in delhi. For travelling in delhi, you can hire car. Most self-drive car rental companies such as Traveltoindia, Progressive Cab and Zoomcar serve Delhi. Transportation Network Taxis Delhi is also serviced by various transportation network ("ridesharing") companies including Uber and Ola Cabs. Make sure to check the tariffs in these before you pay. While most of these services accept cash, many can also be linked to online wallet services like Paytm, so overcharging is rarely a risk. By auto rickshaws Auto-rickshaws - no doors Auto rickshaws (also called three-wheeled scooters, tuk-tuks or simply autos) are good for shorter trips. Always in a distinctive yellow-and-green livery, auto rickshaws are three-wheeled partially enclosed contraptions that run on CNG and can seat three people in the back. In general, they are much cheaper than taxis and can be hailed from the street. Although by law the rickshaw drivers should charge according to the meter in their vehicle (₹25 for the first two km, ₹8/km after), this rate is unrealistically low and they will almost always try to haggle for price. Try to negotiate a price before entering the vehicle. As rules of thumb, expect even the shortest journey to cost ₹30-40/person regardless of the meter, but you should never need to pay over ₹150 for any trip within the city. If you're overquoted, don't be afraid to walk away. It's usually easy to find another one soon, usually with a driver who won't rip you off. If you have any trouble with drivers, go to any of the numerous tourist police stations in the city centre and they will give you a complaint slip which will result in a ₹500 fine for the auto driver. There should also be a telephone number written on the vehicle to call in case of any complaint. There are a number of "Pre-paid" auto stands run by the Police. Tell them where you want to go and pay them upfront. The charge will include ₹5 for the service. You then take the coupon and stand outside where a policeman will direct you to the next available Auto. When your journey is completed you hand the coupon to the auto driver and that's it. Nothing more to pay (despite what they may say). By cycle rickshaws Traffic in Old Delhi's Chawri Bazaar, facing Jama Masjid Cycle rickshaws are three-wheeled, pedal/electric powered rickshaws with seats in the back to seat passengers and a driver in the front. They are good for short distances, or places which are too far to walk but too short for taking a bus/taxi/auto rickshaw. Cycle rickshaws don't use meters, so establish a price before getting on. ₹20-50 is reasonable for most journeys of a few km. Cycle rickshaws are best to use in Old Delhi to visit the intricate galis (walkways) and to enjoy the smells and sounds of the city. By electric rickshaw Electric rickshaws, popularly known as tuk-tuk or e-rickshaws, are also used to enjoy the streets of Old Delhi. These are battery-operated alternatives to auto rickshaws and cycle rickshaws because of their low fuel cost, and less human effort compared to cycle rickshaws. By foot Much of Delhi is quite pedestrian-hostile. Distances are long, road signage is poor, and in the more tourist oriented areas, you'll be constantly accosted by beggars and touts. Crossing roads often involves wading across multiple lanes of heavy traffic. Try your best to move in a predictable straight line, so vehicles can weave around you. Better yet, latch onto a group of locals and cross in their shadow. If you really want to walk around, these places would be good: Walk from Rashtrapati Bhavan (President's house) to India Gate on Kartavya Path (a walk of close to 3–4 km). Walk from Jama Masjid to Red Fort in the Chandni Chowk area. Far South Delhi go walk about in the forest. Try starting from south of Indian Institute of Technology through Sanjay Van to Qutub Minar. Note however that Sanjay Van is not always safe, and it is advisable to go there in a group, preferably during daylight. South Delhi-Green Park-Hauz Khas Village, then to the Hauz Khas ruined madrasa, offers a newer shopping area, an up-market arts village, old ruins, and some quality gardens.

Delhi

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